Liferay 5.2.3: custom URLs formats

Liferay SEO capabilities seems to be surprisingly weak when it comes to URL management. Consider an example: you’re trying to build a webapp that will be doing some abstract searches over some search data sources, and present the results on one page.

You want page to have URL like http://<host>%5B:<port>%5D/section/subsection/search/<keyword>%5B?someParam=<value>%5D
Particular goals: URL can be generated by other website that knows nothing of our Liferay-based portal internals, and it (URL) should be nice and bookmarkable.

On the page you want to have some portlets, provided by different development teams/vendors, that would get the keyword and present results. The portlets should be independent since new ones can be added over time, and you want to be able to order development of several new portlets in parallel via several independent vendors. Thus every portlet on page should be able to obtain <keyword> and <value> passed in URL to page.
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ElasticPath: browsing catalog without specifying category

Greetings dear readers,
As promised in previous post, this time I’m about to explain how to make ElasticPath 6.1.2 allow browsing catalog without specifying a category. This is probably one of the more significant changes we did to core EP6.1.2 logic, so I believe some people might find this post very helpful. On the other hand, the amount of lines of code and configs for this change is actually quite small, so don’t let the significance mention scare you off.
Note: I can not and wish not to give any guarantees about the code/configs provided in this or any other post in my blog – so use at your own risk.
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WordPress inferior

No hierarchical comments on WordPress? No “friends-posts” feed besides this beta-something? I’m starting to regret eradicating my LiveJournal-engine based blogs already…

Maybe one day I’ll take over my laziness and implement blog engine with more decent information-centrific features.

But still I must admit WordPress blogs are very configurable (but do users really prefer this over simplicity of usage? does it harm usability?) when it comes to design and etc. And there are hierarchical categories together with tags (hierarchical tags was one of my ideas that could be used to improve LiveJournal engine) – very good solution for categorization of info.

Well, adding pros and cons WordPress doesn’t really look inferior to LiveJournal to me. But it also doesn’t look superior to it, despite all it’s customizability/configurability.

UPD:
Now I know more – WordPress doesn’t have “friending”. This also automatically means that you can’t have “friend-only” posts, friends-groups, posts visible only to specified friends-groups, etc.
Looks like I’m not going to make friends using WordPress ((-: (it’s a joke ofcourse)

It also has no “communities” – you have to make multi-user blogs instead, which may not be so bad (it may actually even be better than communities), but I have to experience it first to know for sure.
One thing I see (correct me if I’m wrong) is that you can’t create community that users would freely join – you always have to add users manually.

And it doesn’t even have avatars/userpics, which would upset a lot of LiveJournal users, but I don’t really care.
I was completely wrong about this – WordPress does have avatars!

Summing up, WordPress is inferior to LiveJournal in some important aspects, but still has very valuable features for structuring/categorizing information (which are hierarchical categories, plus the usual tags).

And since it’s open source and community driven maybe it may gain important features in near future (I know LiveJournal engine is also GPL, but Six Apart’s LiveJournal service itself is now in hands of russians called SUP, that recently lost an important manager Nosik, so their future is quite dimmed).

Will I stay at WordPress? I guess so. Time shall tell (-;